Teacher pens book of inspiring life lessons

Cheryl Ainsworth-Martin wearing headwear from her African wear collection.
Photo by Tangerine Clarke
Photo by Tangerine Clarke

Cheryl Ainsworth-Martin came from an education dynasty that started in Victoria Village – a small community on the East Coast of Demerara, Guyana. Her parents who were both principals instilled in their nine children the momentousness of education, and the satisfaction it would bring in sharing it. As such, they all became teachers.

Today, as Ainsworth-Martin prepares to retire from her career as a teacher in the New York public school system, she reflects on her 25- year career, with a sense of deep fulfillment that she was instrumental in educating hundreds of children, using friendly methods.

Ainsworth-Martin’s collection of dolls is a testament to how she succeeded in connecting with students from Pre-K, through the middle school level.

In addition to teaching English Language Arts, Humanities, Mathematics, Social Science, and collaborating to management Special Education classes, Ainsworth-Martin uses her dolls from Nigeria and Ghana to educate African-American students, about their history, which she explained is a glorious pass, and something they should be proud of.

Poetry and music have also motivated and helped students in the Brooklyn and Queens school districts with their cultural identity.

“Our past can be used as a tool to change our future, said the eloquent Ainsworth-Martin, who is an outgoing, and proud designer of African ensembles. She is a poet, and public speaker, and someone who has garnered the attention of audiences in churches, classrooms and at stage presentations.

Ainsworth-Martin is very passionate about sharing her knowledge as an educator, and the stirring life of growing up in a family of educators. To this end, she has penned a heartwarming story of her life titled “Family Stories – A Patchwork of Me,” which chronicles the life of this extraordinary and talented motivator.

The artistic Ainsworth-Martin explained that the book showcases different stages in her life of events that happened concurrently – “a vignette so to speak” said the author who lamented that the story will take readers from her experiences growing up in Guyana, and through her life working and living in New York, for the last 33 years.

Ainsworth-Martin, who began her training at Cyril Potter College in Guyana, left there because she was unhappy with the economic situation at that time. She chose the United States, she said because she wanted to continue her teaching career in a country she said that was more stable.

“I have excelled in teaching, singing and writing, and I think of myself as a poet. I like to read my poems to different audiences. Being on stage gives me many opportunities to educate others in the world at large, said the artist, teacher.

“I get great pleasure from entertaining others. I always seize every chance that comes my way to delight others with my interesting rhymes, concepts and ideas,” said Ainsworth-Marin.

“Family Stories: A Patchwork of Me” by Cheryl Ainsworth-Martin.

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