Brooklyn’s notorious rockstar will impact debates/election

The Notorious RBG Ruth Bader Ginsburg face mask.

 Next week when Republican President Donald Trump debate rival, former Democratic Party Vice President Joe Biden, the Sept. 29. confrontation will unlikely focus on topical talking points related to the Covid-19 pandemic, social distancing, spiraling unemployment figures, economic decline, defund the police, Black Lives Matter, blazing infernos on the west coast, climate change, the racial abyss, white supremacy, sex charges levied by yet another accuser of the president, alleged lies, immigration, or a myriad of other issues unearthed by 2020 revelations.

Undeniably one to surface will be the Sept. 18 passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the quest to find a replacement for the champion.

Assuredly many of the compelling queries FOX-Newsman Mike Wallace might ask will resonate with increased interest due to the death of the Flatbush, Brooklyn native.

Born on the Ides of March, her legacy is long with historical documentations beginning at Columbia University continuing to the American Civil Liberties Union where she forged a reputation as a fierce defendant of Civil Rights, the Equal Rights Amendment, LGBTQ, abortion rights, and a plethora of constitutional issues.

Her vociferous opinions impressed President Bill Clinton who nominated her to sit on the Supreme Court on June 14, 1993.

RBG was expected to retire in 2016 but defied concerns of failing opting to remain a tireless advocate for disfranchised citizens.

Two years ago, I was privileged to attend the premiere screening of a document titled “RGB.”

Named in tribute to the petite, Jewish, liberal lawmaker, millennials flocked to witness the celluloid feature whose moniker mimicked Christopher “Biggy” Wallace, a rapper known as the Notorious BIG.

The two female, film directors borrowed the moniker because the then 85-year-old trailblazer said she had much in common with the Brooklyn native.

“The ‘Notorious RBG’ is after the Notorious BIG—well-known rapper. And when they told me that’s what they were calling the Tumblr, I said, ‘Well, of course. We have one big thing in common.

“We were both born and bred in Brooklyn.’”

“Well, my grandchildren love it, and I try to keep abreast of what’s on the Tumblr.”

The West 23rd St. cinema provided an alluring venue for the hot ticket document during the New York Film Festival.

Other screenings slated sold out with audiences begging for SRO (standing room only) access. Another thing they had in common was that in their chosen professions they both exceeded expectations. RBG stood tall at 5’1” and weighing in at 100 hundred pounds Eric Holder, the first Black attorney general of the United States described her “a legal giant.”

Fellow New Yorker Rev. Al Sharpton called her “a liberal lion.”

And others have tagged her “super warrior,” “super diva,” and in other overreaching terms.

Like the Notorious hip-hop wunderkind she was regarded a pop culture icon, akin to a rock star boasting a fan following willing to invest in earrings, cups, caps, T-shirts, laced collars, dolls, coaster and other merchandise branding her merit.

To many more than the cult, she was a game-changer, a national treasure who while championing numerous causes in an extraordinary way used her voice to speak truth to precedence.

“‘I ask no favor for my sex” RBG said, “All I ask of our brethren is that they take their feet off our necks.”

On the cup sold to fans of the judge nicknamed by the alphabets of her name, a phrase “Can’t spell truth without Ruth.”

Phrases she uttered marked posters, postcards and framed messages — “I dissent,” “women belong in all places decisions are being made,” and perhaps the most empowering response she gave which indelibly recall her astuteness.

When asked when there would be enough women on the Supreme Court she said: — “when there are nine.”
Prior to the nomination and confirmation of Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981, nine men claimed every decision ruled by the court.

RBG was only the second woman to be seated.

The Notorious BIG acquired enviable notoriety.

Recently an auction of the prop crown he sported on an album cover fetched a whopping $600,000.

Biggy was “bigger than life” and like the 100-pound icon spoke truths of ordinary people.

Her opinions amplified the hushed dreams of many ignored disfranchised citizens.

Former VP Biden described RBG as “fierce and unflinching.”

She suffered through broken ribs, a bout with shingles, battled colon cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. On Sept. 18, six weeks before the Nov. 3 election the Notorious RBG departed.

Before leaving the 5 feet one-inch giant offered her last hope, a poignant last wish she spoke to her attorney, granddaughter Clara Spera.

“My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

With that said on the day of her passing, thousands showed up at the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. to sing her praises. They sang “Amazing Grace” and hymns of gratitude displaying reverence for her contribution and to commiserate and pay tribute to the second woman to serve on the auspicious bench.

Spontaneous vigils popped up at courthouses here.

Individuals placed floral bouquets, candles, teddy bears and other endearing sentiments.

NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo vowed to erect a monument in her honor.

And in the borough she loved most, its president Eric Adams suggested renaming the Kings County Supreme Court for Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The presidential debate will probably leave the incumbent bobbing and weaving on a national platform he will have to carefully maneuver in order to justify many of the missteps alleged against his leadership

And on Oct. 7, his Vice, Mike Pence may have to dance around the jabs Sen. Kamala Harris will aim to enhance her favorability with voters.

Both Republicans will have to implement boxing’s rope-a-dope strategy.

Both will have to keep both feet on the ground, find a neutral corner, forego each other’s advice otherwise by the time all the ballots are tallied each could end up down and out for the count.

Catch You On The Inside!

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