Brooklyn intersection co-named Dr. Roy A. Hastick Sr. Way

The intersection of Caton and Flatbush avenues in Brooklyn, was co-named Dr. Roy A. Hastick Sr. Way, after a heartfelt ceremony on Saturday, May 8, in honor of the late iconic leader, and founder of the Caribbean American Chamber of Commerce and Industry (CACCI).

New York City Council Member Mathieu Eugene of the 40th Council District, who sponsored the bill where the million-dollar “Caton Flats” housing complex is constructed, and houses CACCI Headquarters, said Dr. Hastick never gave up. “He was a mentor to many, and was truly dedicated to serving his community. We honor his life and will follow his legacy. He was an immigrant like me,” he added.

NYS Assembly Member, Diana C. Richardson of the 43 Assembly District, who partnered with Eugene, said Dr. Hastick had dreams of amplifying the small business community, and to create international trade and commerce to the Caribbean.

“It is rare that we can point to a project that is solution oriented in closing the gap around equality and representation. This is what makes Caton Flats, Dr. Hastick’s dream, such a sweet reality,” said Richardson.

Bishop Cecil Riley, pastor of Freedom Hall Church, blessed the proceedings, attended by wife, Dr. Eda Hastick, daughters, Renee, Camille, Rolanda, Telesford, Tamara and Ivey, grandchildren and elected officials, who praised Dr. Hastick for his outstanding contributions, and thanked Councilman Eugene and Assemblywoman Richardson, for their leadership in honoring the illustrious community leader.

Congresswoman Yvette Clarke called Dr. Hastick a trailblazer who established a community that has been marginalized.

“It is fitting that there are people who came to this community to strengthen it. When I look at his daughters, and the next generations of Hasticks, who are so talented, I see how far we have come.”

Dr. Hastick didn’t do it by himself, he had people in this community and New York, who believed in the vision that we needed a Caribbean Chamber of Commerce, and who spent tireless hours working hard, bringing people together.

“Let us continue today in the spirit of our beloved Dr. Hastick, by standing together to undergird these institutions that have been built in his vision, and continue living out his name and his legacy,” said Clarke.

NY State Comptroller, Thomas P DiNapoli, who presented a Citation to the Hastick family, said Dr. Roy A Hastick Sr. had great strength, and he empowered people to make a difference, “bringing us together.”

“To me, Roy Hastick will always be remembered as a true giant, not only here in Brooklyn, but all across our great state of New York. He had a wonderful life partner in you Eda, and his beautiful family, you kept him going.”

“This building, this street, is a legacy of CACCI, we will always honor,” said DiNapoli.

Brooklyn District Attorney, Eric Gonzales, remembered the once Brooklyn Borough Ambassador as a wonderful human being. “I am happy that Caton and Flatbush will forever bear his name, in the center of the commercial district that he loved so much, we are here because we lost a great man.”

“Dr. Hastick was an amazing man. He helped shaped my thoughts. He also comes from an amazing family. They are very special,” said Scott Stringer, NY City comptroller.

“As we think about “Dr. Hastick outside this building today, we know he was ahead of his time. He understood that the backbone of our city was not the towers of Wall Street, he understood that if we were going to build back our city, we had to do it from the women and minority owned businesses, and he taught generations of small business owners what the path would be.”

“As we create our greatest comeback we have to do it Dr. Hastick’s way, community by community all of us coming together. Our days are ahead of us, and “Dr. Hantick will always loom large,” said Stringer.

Co-Emcee, Greg Bishop, reminded that, Dr. Hastick was not only proud of his country Grenada, but all of the Caribbean, that NYC Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, also a Grenadian endorsed, noting he was an amazing person who left a legacy of love of the Caribbean diaspora.

“He understood that we could not get anywhere, unless we take control of our own economics, and now this building is a testament to who we are. No one has to ask about it, because his name is right outside. We are here because the Hastick name is strong,” said Williams.

NY State Senators Kevin Parker, Roxanne Persaud, Brian Benjamin, and Zellnor Myrie, presented a Resolution, passed in the Senate, and where the lawmakers paused in their deliberations to honor the day, and the accomplishments of the once delegate to the White House on Small Business.

Assembly Members Nick Perry, Jamie Williams, Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn, and Joe Anne Simon, presented a Proclamation, and commended Dr. Hastick, Honoree of the Brooklyn Chambers of Commerce 2020 Black History Month Samuel Dunston Award for business excellence.

Anne Marie Stanislaus, CACCI Board of Directors, Asst. Secretary said Dr. Hastick waited 35 years with patience, perseverance and persistence for his vision to become reality.

He always wanted more for his Caribbean community family, he always asked how can we make a contribution and where can we go to get help.”

“He knew it required partnership and collaboration; so today we are all here to honor you and your collaborators. It has brought CACCI to this great intersection where you will always be remembered.”

“Dr. Roy, we at CACCI board will strive, and thrive to carry on your dream and your legacy,” said Stanislaus.

Also in attendance were, Borough President Eric Adams, Councilmember Robert E Cornegy Jr., Councilmember Farah Louis, Randy Peer (BCC), and retired Hugh Riley, former CTO director, among others.

Granddaughters Denise and Nevaeh Motes, celebrated with a melody, while grandson Davond Motes Jr. played the saxophone, and oldest grandson, Ryan Chew Hastick, played the keyboard.

Choreography, performed by SholaBare Experience dance ensemble to “A song for you” by Donny Hathaway, celebrated the memorable honor, co-hosted by Rose Guerrier, board chair, Rockaway Business Alliance.

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