Bibi Alli writes about the power of the soil, her journey from poverty

Book cover of "The Power of the Soil" by Bibi Nazera Alli.

Bibi Alli’s passion runs deep as the soil she has been tilling from a very young age. Her story is stunning, and worthy of being told during Women’s History Month, that celebrates, beautiful, brilliant sisters.

Alli’s new book, “The Power of the Soil” is the story of a former vendor girl from the Demerara region of Guyana.

“As I reflect on my life, the soil has played a very significant role, from planting seeds as a child, to now planting to share to families from my organization, Culture of Blessing/Fundación Cultura Bendiciones,” said Alli.

“There is power and victory in the soil. As you read through this book, you will be taken on a journey as if you were walking in my shoes. My story illustrates my life as a survivor and a hustler,” she said with conviction.

“I came from a lifestyle of abject poverty, which had showed no possibility of anyone in my family ever seeing a positive outcome in the future,” expressed Alli, adding that she came from a hard working family.

“It was my determination and fortitude to survive such an existence that prompted me to plant vegetables seeds and become a street vendor, hawking my vegetables and fish on the streets of Windsor Forest and Ogle in Demerara, Guyana. This eventually led me out of the quagmire of an extremely disastrous quality of life, though luck guided me to a brighter future in Venezuela, and finally to a very successful way of life and career in the United States of America,” Alli writes with emotion.

The notoriously hardworking lady, who once shared a home with her parents, five sisters and two brothers, chronicles, her harsh upbringing living with an alcohol addicted father. Unfortunately, his troubled life ended with him committing suicide, leaving his wife as the breadwinner.

As the eldest, Alli’s mother felt it would be better for her daughter to accept an opportunity to live and work in Venezuela, offered by a citizen of that country, whose vacation house in Guyana her mother cleaned.

This kindness was the beginning of what would be a new life for Alli, and a chance to help her family.

“I worked as a service girl until my second adoptive family, Mr. Alcaya Abreu in the city of Valencia, helped me and supported my academic training. I learned hairdressing and stylist courses at the INCES Institute. In return, I took care of his six-year-old daughter, Blanca, being her nanny for many years.”

Alli went on to succeed, becoming a wife and mother of two children who were born in Venezuelan, and lived in a beautiful house in Parque Valencia, Edo Carabobo according to her.

“It was after living these experiences that I decided to start a foundation of aid to Venezuela; the homeland that received me when I needed refuge from Guyana,” she said.

“We founded ‘Culture of Blessings’ in Venezuela that I carry in my heart with deep gratitude and a very special love. We will plant every corner of every rural home with hope and joy and God will fill us with blessings so that there is no lack of food, in those homes,” she remarked.

Years later after emigrating to the United States, she lived in Brooklyn for four years where she worked in her own hairdressing business as a stylist. “My husband did not follow me and after four years of marriage we were divorced. My two children live with me,” she said.

Alli, declared, she now has a wonderful life, and spends part of her time as a volunteer with various non government organizations (NGOs) to help to eradicate poverty, and to empower women so they can raise future leaders.

“I’ve written this book for all women who, like myself, have suffered in their respective lives. I have learned that God has a plan for us and directs our paths. I believe that nothing is impossible, and I would like you to discover who you are and work hard towards your dream. It may be a journey, but be determined and trust in God. Your seeds of greatness will bear fruit,” assured the brave woman.

“I later visited my home country, Guyana, in South America and observed that many families were poverty stricken also. So I bought a piece of land and again rolled up my sleeves and started planting. There, I also encouraged planting for survival and gave families access to my land and its bearings.

“On Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, 2021, I further gave planting presentations in the United States. I shared love by providing small potted plants as giveaways, instead of chocolates and teddy bears. I wanted to emphasize the importance of planting for survival,” she shared.

“I launched my foundation, Culture of Blessings, four years ago. I thought of that name because it is intended for diverse cultures to receive God’s blessings of planting for survival.”

“In my book, ‘The Power of the Soil,’ I share how every season of my life has transformed me to be the person I am today. My mission is to continue to empower women as they progress towards financial freedom,” said Alli.

“I am a new woman going forward on a new journey. I will stand out and show the world that I haven’t forgotten where I came from,” said Alli, a woman on a mission.

The goals of Culture of Blessing/Fundación Cultura Bendiciones foundaiton is to maintain direct contact with the community, while achieving great benefits in the short and long term and to expand horizons to other communities.

The organization conducts workshops, talks and seminars, related to the preparation and execution of planting food and animal husbandry, while supporting the development and social improvements for a better quality of life, said the woman committed to humanity.

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