Home New York National Sports Calendar

New Kingston hits Highline Ballroom April 15

From left, Courtney LJ Panton (father), Courtney M Panton, Tahir Panton, and Stephen Suckarie.
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Caribbean Life on Facebook.

Brooklyn-based reggae band New Kingston is not only riding high on its success as one of the most sought after Urban Conscious Reggae bands in New York, the group is also gearing up to do cuts from its 2016, album, “Kingston Fyah,” at Manhattan’s Highline Ballroom, on April 15.

With six albums to their brand, the Jamaican roots band, groomed by father, Courtney L J. Paton, bassist, and brothers Courtney M. Paton, Tahir Paton, and Stephen Suckarie, are excited to turn up the vibes to attract fans to their infectious blend of reggae music.

The band has made a name for itself with hits such as “Protect Me,” “You are Mine,” “Today,” “Can’t Stop A Man,” “No Friend,” and “Honorable.”

Tahir Paton told Caribbean Life that the band is super excited to usher in the warm weather, when fans want to listen to good reggae music. “This is the best time of the year to turn-up the vibes, and New Kingston is just the kind of roots band, that will get the crowd in the groove.”

He added that the group is all about family and togetherness, and this shows through in the superb sound they bring to every stage performance. Their début album “In the Street” was released in 2010 and features “Pon Di Wall,” “Feel it,” “Don’t Cry,” among other lyrical composition.

The Kingston EP, release in 2011, and Kingston University, in 2013, and Kingston City in 2015, are all thrilling reggae fans worldwide.

Known for their mixed genres of R&B and the more edgy music, Dancehall music, New Kingston, who plays progressive reggae music, is influenced by both their Jamaican culture roots, and the diversity of their hometown, Brooklyn.

“Our reggae music is progressive and it is influenced by both our Jamaican roots, our culture, and the sound of the rhythm of Brooklyn, said Tahir, adding that he and his brothers while group up, listened to the music of late, great, artist, Michael Jackson, Luther Vandross and Whispers, but has crafted and entirely unique sound that pays homage to father Courtney Paton Sr.

One cannot deny the level of skills these artists have achieved, learning from great reggae giants, Bob Marley and Dennis Brown.

Carving a niche for themselves from their Brooklyn basement apartment, New Kingston was relentless in their persistence and unwavering passion, as the best reggae band out of Brooklyn, and according to their website, this led to their placement on tour supporting other major acts on the scene.

This gave the band scope to succeed on stage, as they build their fan base and own triumph presence.

The world-renowned New Kingston, performed at sold-out shows wowing fans in places such as Poland and the United Kingdom, stops on its 2016, European tour.

The band has just completed a new, yet to be titled album, and has shot many music videos.

www.newkingstonmusic to listen, and download at iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud.

Updated 5:04 pm, March 20, 2017
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Caribbean Life on Facebook.

Reader feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not CaribbeanLifeNews.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to CaribbeanLifeNews.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.