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Books

July, 2015

The life of a 1960s Harlem kid

Books: Your last family reunion was a big one. It was fun, too, and eye-opening. You hadn’t really stopped to think about how many people are related to you until you saw aunts you hadn’t seen in decades and met cousins you didn’t even know you had. Comment.

June, 2015

Dread publishes ‘Half’ Told memoir

Books: In a memoir published by Akashik Books, Doctor Dread reveals “The Half That’s Never Been Told,” a 256-page account about his encounters and travels promoting Jamaica’s reggae music and in addition tells another story that advances his own investments in the genre. Comment.

Relationship advice from the guys

Books: Relationship advice from the guys! On Thursday, May 20, Dr. Jean Alerte along with Frank Gateau held a book signing in Brooklyn, N.Y. for the newly released relationship book, “Single Man, Married Man.” Comment.

May, 2015

AphroChic fuses culture and interior design

Books: Personal style goes far beyond the clothes on your back. How you style your home after graduating from the cutesy designs of your college dorm room courtesy of Target, says a lot about you, your interests and maybe even your cultural background. For the happily married Jeanine Hays and Bryan Mason, interior design and culture go hand in hand. Comment.

From the depths of depression

Books: You’re tired of having red eyes. You’re tired of crying, too; tired of an empty soul, runny nose, and dry mouth but you know there are more tears inside you and they need to come out. Whoever said that big girls don’t cry needs to know that that’s not true: as in the new book “Welcome to My Breakdown” by Benilde Little, sometimes crying is only the beginning. Comment.

Kids’ book reminds us ‘You know that look!’

Books: “Child, Please” by Ylonda Gault Caviness Comment.

‘Chocolatey Brown’ no matter what

Books: The aesthetic may change but the fact remains that chocolate, in all forms, is undoubtedly sweet. Instilling confidence into every chocolate girl is Stephanie Fleary, an elementary school teacher, entrepreneur, single mother and author. Publishing “Chocolatey Brown” in February this year, Fleary has crafted a book to push girls of darker skin and all shades that they are beautiful no matter what. Comment.

New book armed with lessons in civic education

Books: What does it mean to be a “good citizen?” Comment.

April, 2015

When do you become an American?

Books: I am a Boringuen. I am a West Indian. I am a Barbadian. So said poets El David Rodriguez (Puerto Rico) The Art of Word, and Negus Tehuti Adeyemi (US/Barbados) Soularadiance, and novelist Annette Vendryes Leach (US / Panama / Jamaica) Song of the Shaman at the readings and conversation in the Tellin’ Our Story series of the Caribbean Cultural Theatre. Comment.

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Spicy ‘One Night’ is worth two looks

Books: Would you look at that. Actually, probably, you already have. You’re one of the most observant people you know, never missing a thing, always noticing. You make a great witness because you see everything. And in the new book “One Night” by Eric Jerome Dickey, you see two people about to make a mistake. Comment.

‘Songbirds’ sing praises

Music: Ask author Heather Augustyn, the name of the world’s first female rappers and you might be surprised at her response. Contrary to popular belief, it is not Queen Latifah. Comment.

Find your path to success

Books: Where do you go from here? You’ve been looking at your life and everything around you, and that’s the question you’ve been asking: what next? What will you do with the rest of your days? In the new book “Reach,” edited by Ben Jealous and Trabian Shorters, foreword by Russell Simmons, you may find some guidance. Comment.

March, 2015

An oddball’s life after high school

Books: There is life after high school. And were you ever happy to learn that! You couldn’t imagine spending the rest of your days feeling like you did at 13, or enduring a not-cool lifetime of zits, hormones, self-consciousness, bad hair, and Mean Girls. You were only able to endure it then by remembering that you weren’t alone. And in “The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl” by Issa Rae, life got better. Comment.

Ghanaian ‘game changer’ with a twist

Books: Your father always told you to reach for the stars. Be the best you can be, he said. Never let obstacles get in your way. Strive for success and challenge yourself – all excellent advice, but how can you harness astronomical success in this, or any economy? In the new book “It’s Not Rocket Science” by Mary Spio, you’ll find some stellar ideas. Comment.

Josephine Baker’s many faces

Books: You are a kid with determination. You set your sights on something, and it’s done. You don’t waste any time, don’t mess around — you want it and you’ll have it, one way or another. Comment.

Angella Ricot pens new story of lust, greed, politics

Books: The new novel “Sahara” (published by AuthorHouse) by author Angella Ricot follows a beautiful heroine through the political intrigues of the 1990s and early 2000s as she finds herself in the center of a political scandal that threatens to consume her. Comment.

February, 2015

Steel Pulse to liven Brooklyn book launch

Music: Reggae fans will be nourished mentally, physically and probably in other ways when they stop into the Brooklyn Public Library on March 4 for a book launch. Comment.

‘1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music’

Books: You turned up the volume – again. Surely, the guy in the car next to yours must think you’re weird. There you are, groovin’ to your tunes, seat-dancing, singing along like you were in-concert. Really, is there such a thing as having the music too loud? Comment.

January, 2015

God loves Haiti

Books: This is a very different tale of two cities. A Haiti-born writer who grew up in both Port-au-Prince and Brooklyn has published a novel featuring a character navigating the very same dual identity. First-time author Dimitry Elias Leger said his book “God Loves Haiti,” which he will read from at PowerHouse Arena in Dumbo in Jan. 22, explores the question that he and so many of his jet-setting peers have grappled with — how to stay connected to Caribbean culture after leaving their homeland. Comment.

‘Driving the King’

Books: Everybody has that one friend… Comment.